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Best wireless PlayStation 4 gaming headsets

Getting a wireless Playstation 4 gaming headset can be a little tricky, but don't worry: we've got some great options picked out for you.
By
February 24, 2022
HyperX Cloud Flight S
By Kingston
The HyperX Cloud Flight S wireless gaming headset in black against a white background.
8.3
Check price
Positives
Good wireless performance
Battery life
Sound quality
PC and PS4 surround sound
Negatives
Weird button layout
Mic quality
Qi charging pad costs extra
The Bottom Line.
The HyperX Cloud Flight S is a comfortable wireless gaming headset that executes on all the right features to be a solid multi-platform option.
Read full review...
EPOS H3PRO Hybrid
By EPOS
The EPOS H3PRO Hybrid headset.
8.2
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Positives
Comfortable
Connects everywhere
Good sound
ANC
Negatives
Battery is always in use, even when wired
Frame is a little tight
Expensive
The Bottom Line.
The EPOS H3PRO Hybrid can scratch pretty much every itch someone looking for a gaming headset might have. It's got ANC, it's wireless, it sounds good, and it's comfortable.
Read full review...
SteelSeries Arctis 7+ Wireless
By SteelSeries
The SteelSeries Arctis 7+ Wireless in black against a white background.
7.6
Check price
Positives
Battery life
Comfortable design
In-app EQ
Exceptional battery life
2.4GHz wireless USB-C and 3.5mm connectivity options
Negatives
Sonar software has issues
Extra bass
The Bottom Line.
The Arctis 7+ Wireless works anywhere and lasts well over 70 hours.
Read full review...
Playstation Gold Wireless Headset
By Sony
Product image of the Playstation Gold gaming headset against a white background.
7.3
Check price
Positives
Comfortable
Surround sound PS4
Sound
Negatives
Mic
Headphones aren't great for big ears
Battery life
The Bottom Line.
The Playstation Gold Wireless Headset does a few things very well, and a few things less so. Get this if you don't need a mic, and don't care about short battery life.
Read full review...
Razer Barracuda X
By Razer
The Razer Barracuda X cross-platform gaming headset in black against a white background.
7.6
Check price
Positives
Lightweight
Great microphone
Battery
Price
Negatives
Isolation
Sub-bass under emphasis
The Bottom Line.
The Razer Barracuda X is a simple, solid wireless gaming headset. It doesn't come with a lot of bells and whistles, but it works on a lot of platforms, it's comfortable, and it sounds good.
Read full review...

Gaming headsets are meant to do a lot things, but if there’s one singularly consistent element informing everything about their design, it’s convenience. These are products meant to simplify your audio setup, regardless of how you play video games. But, you know what isn’t convenient? Stretching a cord across your living room to take advantage of your gaming headsets’ different features. Luckily, there are all sorts of wireless PlayStation 4 gaming headsets.

Related: The best wireless PlayStation 5 gaming headsets

Editor’s note: this list of the best wireless PlayStation 4 headsets was updated on February 24, 2022, to add the SteelSeries Arctis 7+ Wireless and to expand the Buying guide with information on frequency response.

HyperX Cloud Flight S is the best wireless PlayStation 4 headset

The HyperX Cloud Flight S has the remarkable distinction of being one of the only gaming headsets around to offer surround sound on PlayStation 4—when the field narrows to wireless headsets, it’s one of maybe two. However, if that was the only thing this headset had going for it, it probably wouldn’t be worth considering.

HyperX Cloud Flight S
8.3
A picture of the HyperX Cloud Flight S leans on a Playstation 4 controller on a wooden table.The HyperX Cloud Flight S leans on a Playstation 4 controller on a wooden table in front of the HyperX Qi-compatible wireless charging base.The HyperX Cloud Flight S sits on a wooden table by a window with a chair on the other side of it.The HyperX Cloud Flight S sits on the HyperX Qi-compatible wireless charging base.The HyperX Cloud Flight S sits on a stand on a black reflective surface,A frequency response chart for the HyperX Cloud Flight SAn isolation chart for the HyperX Cloud Flight S
HyperX Cloud Flight S
Buy now
See review
See review

This gaming headset is built to be the convenient option for switching back and forth between the PC and PlayStation 4, and as such, most of its features work well on both. It’s got solid, if a little bass-heavy sound, a decent detachable microphone, best-in-class over 35-hour battery life. Wireless audio is achieved using a 2.4GHz RF wireless USB dongle, and it’s pretty much a plug-and-play affair. On top of all that, this is the first gaming headset to support Qi wireless charging, so you can place it on top of any compatible charging pad you’ve got. HyperX makes a charging pad to go with this, but sells it separately, which is a shame.

The headset’s rather considerable amount of options is all controlled by buttons and switches, including the surround sound function. It’s a little tricky to keep all the different controls straight, but once you do there’s a lot you can control on the fly, including the usual volume and mic mute options, as well as affecting game/chat and a few other things. Despite all these extra controls, the HyperX Cloud Flight S still maintains a straightforward and comfortable design with a good mic (listen here).

The EPOS H3PRO Hybrid can do just about anything, for a price

Since it split with Sennheiser, gaming audio company EPOS has put out consistently interesting products that never quite crossed into the “great” category. That’s where the EPOS H3PRO Hybrid comes in. This wireless gaming headset connects pretty much every way you could—it works wirelessly using Bluetooth or USB dongle, and wired over USB or 3.5mm.

EPOS H3PRO Hybrid
8.2
A man wears the EPOS H3PRO HybridThe EPOS H3PRO Hybrid lays on a metal table in front of a notebook, next to a Google Pixel 4a.The EPOS H3PRO Hybrid leans on a PlayStation DualSense controller, connected over 3.5m, in front of a PlayStation 5 running Knockout CityThe EPOS H3PRO Hybrid gaming headset sits on a headphone standA noise cancelling chart for the EPOS H3PRO HybridA frequency response chart for the EPOS H3PRO Hybrid gaming headset, which shows a very accurate frequency response.

Once you’ve connected the H3PRO Hybrid to your PlayStation 4, you’re in for a pretty great experience. The headset sounds nice, and it’s got a great microphone (listen here). It’s comfortable over long gaming sessions, and its snug fit makes for solid isolation performance. Adding to the isolation performance is the headset’s active noise cancelling (ANC) feature, which works pretty well compared to other noise cancelling options and makes for basically the best attenuation you can find in a gaming headset. And even with ANC turned on, the headset can last over 18 hours of playback on a single charge.

The EPOS H3PRO Hybrid also brings software features like custom EQ profiles and 7.1 virtual surround sound using the EPOS Gaming Suite companion app. Basically, this is an expensive gaming headset, but it checks pretty much every box there is.

If the PlayStation 4 isn’t your only gaming platform, consider the SteelSeries Arctis 7+

The SteelSeries Arctis 7+ Wireless uses the same USB-C dongle as the Arctis 1 Wireless and Arctis 7P. Now this may not seem like such a good thing for someone who just needs something for the PlayStation 4, but if you need something to work across platforms, this is probably your best bet.

SteelSeries Arctis 7+ Wireless
7.6
The SteelSeries Arctis 7+ lays a on fabric surface next to a Google Pixel 4a with the USB-C dongle plugged in.The SteelSeries Arctis 7+ sits on a headphone stand.The SteelSeries Arctis 7+ lays on a wooden table.A man sits at a computer wearing the SteelSeries Arctis 7+ gaming headset.The SteelSeries Arctis 7+ lays on a leather desk mat in front of a HyperX mechanical gaming keyboard and a Logitech gaming mouse.The SteelSeries Arctis 7+ lays on a wooden table with it's controls on full display.The SteelSeries Arctis 7+ lays on a fabric surface with its retractable microphone extended andAn isolation chart for the SteelSeries Arctis 7+, which shows decent if unremarkable isolation performance.A frequency response chart for the SteelSeries Arctis 7+, which shows dramatically emphasized bass and mid range sound.
SteelSeries Arctis 7+ Wireless
Buy now
See review
See review

On top of the USB-C dongle, there’s an easy USB-A adaptor cord for PlayStation 4, and PC if needed. Using USB-C means this can also plug into the bottom of many smartphones without much issue, as well as the bottom of a Nintendo Switch. You can use the included 3.5mm cable to plug into your Xbox One controller. SteelSeries even incorporates USB-C audio passthrough here too, giving you a ton of options on how to connect.

On top of its fantastic compatibility, the Arctis 7+ Wireless design is nearly identical to the Arctis 7 and Arctis 7P, which both feature a clever suspension headband. The ear pads are made of SteelSeries’ signature airweave fabric, so heat buildup really isn’t an issue. This headset is comfortable enough for multi-hour gaming sessions, and it can last for much longer than that. In our testing, we found the Arctis 7+ Wireless can last 71 hours, 42 minutes before you need to recharge with the USB-C cable.

A screenshot of SteelSeries GG, which shows tabs for SteelSeries Engine, SteelSeries Sonar, and some less useful options.
Sonar launched in beta with SteelSeries Arctis 7+ and it offers a lot of the same features as Engine.

The microphone is very good, though you’ll get better sound when you speak over a 3.5mm connection compared to a wireless one (wired mic sample, wireless mic sample). With a pretty generous bass bump, the Arctis 7+ Wireless makes bass frequencies sound about twice as loud as mids, which makes explosions that much more prominent.

PlayStation Gold Wireless Headset offers features with hardware and custom software

Sometimes you want something simple that just works, and given how console peripherals are always a little wonky, where better to go than the source. The PlayStation Gold Wireless Headset offers straightforward connectivity with its USB dongle and performance backed by Sony.

Playstation Gold Wireless Headset
7.3
Playstation Gold Wireless Headset
Buy now
See review
See review

This sleek PS4 headset supports virtual 7.1 surround sound and can connect to the PlayStation 4, PlayStation 3, PlayStation Vita (!), and PC without issue (though Vita and PC only support stereo sound). It comes with both a wired 3.5mm cable and a USB dongle for connecting to devices, so you shouldn’t have any compatibility options. It might not look like it, but the headset also has a mic embedded into the left earphone, so you can chat to your heart’s content, though you won’t sound all that good. Listen here.

This wireless gaming headset is comfortable and straightforward on its own, but if you want to get a little more granular, it’s got something for you too. There’s an app available on the PlayStation Store for free to all for further customization on the console.

The Razer Barracuda X brings solid wireless audio on a budget

Razer’s newest gaming headset, the Barracuda X looks fairly by the numbers, is a solid performer nonetheless. Featuring none of the typical Gamer-y looking visual flourishes, this wireless gaming headset offers a reliable microphone, good sound, and a USB-C dongle for a reasonable price.

Razer Barracuda X
7.6
The Razer Barracuda X gaming headset lays flat on a table connected to a Google Pixel 4a via USB-C dongle.The Razer Barracuda X sits on a headphone stand in front of a windowThe Razer Barracuda X leans on a PlayStation 5 with its USB-C dongle plugged into the front of the console.A frequency response chart for the Razer Barracuda X, which shows a dip in sub-bass response, and added emphasis in the bass and mid range.An isolation chart for the Razer Barracuda X, which shows pretty average passive isolation for a gaming headset.

This headset features pretty solid audio output, with slightly under-emphasized sound in the sub-bass range. However, the microphone is pretty solid, ably transmitting and loud chat audio without issue. Add onto that the USB-C dongle, which makes this compatible with PlayStation 5 and Nintendo Switch (docked and undocked) and you’ve got a compelling package. You can get an idea of how the microphone sounds here.

Thee best wireless PlayStation 4 headsets: Notable mentions

A man wears the Razer BlackShark V2 Pro gaming headset sitting at a PC, with posters for The Adventure Zone and My Brother, My Brother, and Me on the wall behind him.
It doesn’t matter if you’ve got $500 budget or a $50 one, the Razer BlackShark V2 Pro is worth considering.
  • Bose QuietComfort 35 II Gaming Headset: Based on the same design and tech as the original Bose QuietComfort 35 II, these cans double as a great-sounding gaming headset and a reliable pair of Bluetooth headphones for casual listening.
  • HyperX Cloud II Wireless: This no-frills wireless gaming headset gets the basics right, offering great audio quality, a comfortable design, and over 30 hours of battery life. Its available for $150 USD—a price tag that shouldn’t be too out of reach for most gamers.
  • Razer BlackShark V2 Pro: This headset has everything you’d want in a gaming headset: a low-profile aesthetic, unparalleled comfort, great sound profile, and compatibility with a wide variety of gaming platforms.
  • Sennheiser GSP 670: This sub-$200 headset offers a very comfortable design and very accurate audio reproduction, and should appeal to gamers who are quite picky when it comes to sound quality. It also comes equipped with Bluetooth, with support for high quality codecs like AAC, aptX, and aptX Low Latency.

Hold up! Something’s different:

Some of this article’s picks or notable mentions have frequency response and isolation charts that were measured with our old testing system. We have since purchased a Bruel & Kjaer 5128 test fixture (and the appropriate support equipment) to update our testing and data collection. It will take a while to update our backlog of old test results, but we will update this review (and many others!) once we’re able with improved sound quality measurements and ANC performance plots. These will be made obvious with our new chart aesthetic (black background instead of white).

Thank you for bearing with us, and we hope to see you again once we’ve sorted everything out.

What you should know about wireless PlayStation 4 gaming headsets

Do you need a wireless headset with the PlayStation 4?

A photo of a Sony PlayStation 4 dual-shock controller sitting on a wooden desk, showing the 3.5mm analog TRRS port on the front.
That little hole there? A totally functional 3.5mm port.

The PlayStation 4 runs into the kinds of quirks and constraints typical of a modern console. You can plug just about any 3.5mm headset into the console’s DualShock controller it’ll work just fine. In a way, because of this connection method, you don’t really need a wireless headset—regardless of which one you use, you’ll never be stretching a cord across your living room. However, if you want access to more features than just a pair of headphones with a microphone attached, you’ll need to change things up and go wireless.

If you’re looking to get a little more out of your gaming headset, your best bet is to switch to a USB connection. If you’re in the all-too-common situation where stretching a headphone cord across your living room just isn’t realistic, getting a wireless headset is your best bet. The PlayStation 4 doesn’t support Bluetooth audio, so all wireless headsets need dongles, and that’s probably for the best—USB dongles all use 2.4GHz RF transmitters for sound, which is entirely lag free. Just be ready to give up one of your console’s few USB ports for the rest of its life.

What is frequency response?

The frequency response chart for the Razer Kraken V3 (cyan) compared to our consumer curve V2 (pink).
Aside from a notable boost in bass frequencies and some variation in treble, the Razer Kraken V3 follows our house curve fairly close.

A frequency response just denotes the range of tones that a component (headset) can reproduce. 20Hz-20kHz is a common frequency range because it aligns with the lower and upper limits of human hearing. But a simple range of numbers doesn’t tell the whole story, to add more information we provide frequency response charts for all of our reviews. This depicts where, within a given frequency range, a headset amplifies or under-emphasizes certain frequencies.

Many of our charts feature two lines: cyan and pink, with the cyan line representing the headset in question and the pink line representing a particular SoundGuys house curve. While our house curve isn’t objectively perfect, it is what we posit that most listeners will enjoy when picking up a pair of consumer or studio/audiophile headphones.

Gaming headsets tend to boost bass notes to make explosions even boomier, though this isn’t really necessary. See, game audio engineers generally tune the game mix so that action sounds like gunfire or explosions are the loudest elements in a mix. So, if you see a headset that under-emphasizes bass or sub-bass notes, it’s not a huge deal in this arena.

What about the PlayStation 5?

The PlayStation 5 in white against a white background.

In November 2020, Sony launched its latest gaming console: the PlayStation 5. With a striking black and white design, this new console brings a suite of new audio capabilities, including its own built-in spatial audio system. The console supports audio connections over 3.5mm through the new DualSense controller, as well as via USB-A and USB-C ports on the console itself, and it can send 3D audio through any of those methods. It doesn’t support Bluetooth audio connection.

Related: The best PlayStation 5 gaming headsets

It wasn’t terribly clear before launch, but we now know that pretty much every accessory compatible with the PlayStation 4 will also work with the PlayStation 5. This means that any headset you buy on this list will also work just fine if you decide to upgrade consoles. Additionally, you won’t even need an adapter cable for headsets like the SteelSeries Arctis 1 Wireless and Arctis 7P, which is nice.

Why you should trust Sam

When it comes down to it, I don’t just review gaming headsets because I’m passionate about good audio. Pretty much everything I do here at SoundGuys focuses on gaming content, and that’s because I’ve been a gamer my whole life. You name it, I’ve probably played it. I know what kind of audio features are important for different kinds of games, and maybe more importantly: which ones aren’t.

The gaming headset space, much like many other parts of the audio industry, is rife with exaggerated language and gimmicky features that often don’t add much of anything to your experience. It’s easy to get caught up in the flashy lights and promises of immersive audio and bass so intense it’ll rupture your eardrums (in a good way, somehow), but most of that stuff flat out doesn’t matter. That’s why we review headsets, and why we have lists like this.

Frequently asked questions about gaming headsets

The biggest difference between the two headsets relates to design. The Corsair Void RGB Elite Wireless sports a sturdy metal frame with jet-black finished ear cups, while the Corsair Virtuoso Wireless SE is adorned with gunmetal aluminum accents and micro-perforations for the RGB lighting. The Virtuoso Wireless SE also delivers better sound quality compared to the Void RGB Elite wireless, although its sound profile is still better suited for gaming rather than casual listening. Besides those two key differences, both headsets deliver comparable wireless performance, isolation, and battery life.

No, none of these headsets feature active noise cancelling. That being said, it’s important to make sure that your next headset has good isolation performance, which ultimately determines how well a product is able to block out ambient noise.

When it comes to convenience, wireless is king. However, wired headsets have superior sound quality over their wireless counterpart. This is because wired connections allow for a greater amount of data transmission, resulting in higher fidelity audio with less latency. It is worth noting  that as new wireless technologies develop, the gap between wired and wireless sound quality is closing to the point where unless you’re a true audiophile you may not even notice a difference.

Be sure to check out our list of the best Playstation 4 headsets, which feature some wired options for those who prefer sound quality over convenience.