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The best wireless Xbox Series X/S gaming headsets

Xbox Series X/S offers pretty much identical audio features as the Xbox One, but a new generation of consoles still brings a new generation of headsets.
By
May 10, 2022
SteelSeries Arctis 7X
By SteelSeries
The SteelSeries Arctis 7X gaming headset in black against a white background.
Check price
Positives
USB-C dongle works on lots of platforms
Comfortable
Great battery life
Solid mic and audio
Negatives
Pricier than the regular Arctis 7
Poor isolation
The Bottom Line.
The SteelSeries Arctis 7X is a great multi-platform option for Xbox Series X/S gamers. It's comfortable, sounds good, and it's easy to use. What more could you want?
Razer Kaira Wireless
By Razer
The Razer Kaira Wireless in black against a white background.
7.5
Check price
Positives
Price
Microphone
Comfortable
Negatives
Few features
Bad PC experience
The Bottom Line.
The Razer Kaira Wireless is an affordable option for anyone who wants something good but doesn't love the idea of spending a huge chunk on something that only works on one platform.Read full review...
Microsoft Xbox Wireless Headset
By Microsoft
6.9
Check price
Positives
Decent microphone
Bluetooth and USB-C audio
Price
App makes PC experience better
Negatives
Significant bass boost
Only SBC codec support
Discomfort
The Bottom Line.
The Microsoft Xbox Wireless Headset is one of the few headsets to use Xbox Wireless and actually offer a decent PC experience. It's otherwise not a bad headset, but really only exemplary if you're going back and forth.Read full review...
LucidSound LS50X
By LucidSound
The LucidSound LS50X gaming headset in black against a white background.
7.4
Check price
Positives
Sound
Bluetooth with SBC and AAC
Atmos for Headphones
Battery life
Negatives
Expensive
No reliable high-quality codec for Android
The Bottom Line.
The LucidSound LS50X costs a lot more than most of the other headsets on this list, but there's a reason for that: It packs in a lot more features than most Xbox Wireless gaming headsets.Read full review...
Astro A20 (Gen 2)
By Astro
The Astro A20 gaming headset for Xbox against a white background.
7.3
Check price
Positives
Comfortable
Good sound
Battery life
Can purchase PS5 transmitter (costs extra)
Negatives
EQ profiles aren't super noticeable
No game/chat mix off Xbox
No wired connectivity
The Bottom Line.
The Astro A20 (Gen 2) is comfortable and easy to use, but while it's not very expensive, it's a little barebones compared to the competition.Read full review...

Finding the right wireless gaming headset for your Xbox Series X/S setup can be tricky—not as tricky as actually finding one of the new consoles, mind you, but tricky all the same. What works on other platforms probably won’t work here. Here are the best options we’ve run into—based on our reviews, and research around the web.

Editor’s note: this list of the best wireless Xbox Series X/S gaming headsets was updated on May 10, 2022, to expand the Buying guide, include a disclosure box regarding old test data, and to include the Astro A20 on the list.

Why is the SteelSeries Arctis 7X the best wireless Xbox Series X/S gaming headset?

The higher end of the Steelseries Arctis line has been home to some of the most comfortable gaming headsets on the market for years, and that remains true with the company’s next-gen refresh of the Arctis 7. The SteelSeries Arctis 7X is a rarity among recent wireless Xbox Series X/S gaming headsets, in that it doesn’t actually use Xbox Wireless for its connection.

SteelSeries Arctis 7X
The SteelSeries Arctis 7X gaming headset on concrete and split into a separate image with green lighting.A frequency response chart for the SteelSeries Arctis 7P, which shows very accurate audio compared to our target curve.A isolation chart for the SteelSeries Arctis 7P which shows average performance,
SteelSeries Arctis 7X
Buy now

Much like the PlayStation 5 variant of the same headset, this gaming headset uses a USB-C dongle to connect wirelessly to your console. While going back to using a dongle may not immediately seem like a positive thing, it opens up a much wider range of compatibility. This is one of the only wireless Xbox gaming headsets to come out in years to support connection to not only Xbox and PC, but also Nintendo Switch and Android smartphones (provided they have a USB-C port). The headset comes with a USB-A adapter, so it’s compatible with the Switch whether it’s docked or undocked.

On top of such wide compatibility, the SteelSeries Arctis 7X brings fantastic battery life—the identical PlayStation 5 version clocked in at over 27 hours of playback on a single charge. The headset also brings accurate audio, and a clear and loud microphone, though people with deeper voices may find they come through a little distorted.

The Razer Kaira Wireless brings high performance for a low budget

One of Razer’s newest gaming headsets, the Kaira Wireless is the cheaper of two Kaira gaming headsets (alongside the Kaira Pro). While the Kaira Pro brings Bluetooth support, it’s still pretty much a single platform gaming headset, especially given its poor PC compatibility. The Razer Kaira Wireless is similarly limited, but it’s also a cheaper, more focused device.

Razer Kaira Wireless
7.5
The Razer Kaira Wireless leans on an Xbox One controller on a wooden table near a window with the blinds drawnA man wears the Razer Kaira Wireless sitting at a computer, with posters for My Brother, My Brother and Me, and Canada Heritage Minutes in the background.The Razer Kaira Wireless lays on a wooden table with one headphone turned up and the other laying flat.A frequency response chart for the Razer Kaira gaming headset, which shows boosted bass and under-emphasized highs.An isolation chart for the Razer Kaira Wireless shows that the gaming headset can effectively mitigate the loudness of sounds above 1kHz.A chart depicts the Razer Kaira Wireless (cyan) frequency response relative to our consumer curve V2 (pink), and the Kaira Wireless has a pretty accurate frequency response across the board.
Razer Kaira Wireless
Buy now
See review
See review

For $99 USD, you get a wireless gaming headset that connects to your Xbox Series X/S using Xbox Wireless and brings more than 21 hours of battery life, accurate audio, and a great-sounding microphone. There’s not much more to it than that—the Razer Kaira Wireless is a comfortable, straightforward gaming headset, and it won’t break the bank if you’re staring down the barrel of multiple headset purchases for different platforms.

The Xbox Wireless Headset supports Bluetooth connectivity, too

Not to be confused with any other headset that uses the Xbox Wireless connection standard, Microsoft’s Xbox Wireless Headset is the official gaming headset for the Xbox Series X/S.

Microsoft Xbox Wireless Headset
6.9
The Xbox Wireless Headset sits on a wooden table with its controls displayed.A frequency response chart for the Xbox Wireless Headset, which shows dramatically boosted bass.An isolation chart for the Xbox Wireless Headset, which shows pretty average attenuation.
Microsoft Xbox Wireless Headset
Buy now
See review
See review

Normally, we’re pretty hesitant to recommend the official offering of any given platform because, well… they often suck—Sony is among the best at making headphones, not so much when it comes to making gaming headsets, for instance. However, it’s clear here that Microsoft made an effort to improve on the most consistent shortcomings of wireless headsets for the Xbox: PC compatibility.

The Xbox Wireless Headset still depends on a USB dongle sold separately to connect to most PCs (unless they have Xbox Wireless built-in, which happens). However, it now comes with an app that lets you change the headset’s EQ settings, turn mic monitoring on, and get an accurate battery reading. It may not sound like a lot, but it’s more than just about every other gaming headset for Xbox Series X/S does.

The headset itself is also not a bad performer. It boosts bass pretty dramatically, but otherwise sounds pretty accurate, plus it’s got decent battery life and pretty nice microphone.

The LucidSound LS50X brings some premium features along with it

The LucidSound LS50X bucks the trend of simplifying gaming headsets for the new generation of consoles, packing a number of desirable features. On top of a comfortable build, solid audio, and an accurate microphone, the headset brings Bluetooth compatibility and support for Dolby Atmos for Headphones.

LucidSound LS50X
7.4
The LucidSound LS50X lays on a cloth surface.The LucidSound LS50X Leans on an Xbox One controller on a wooden table.A frequency response chart for the LucidSound LS50X , which shows a big de-emphasis in the sub bass range.A chart depicts the LucidSound LS50X gaming headset's isolation performance which is basically average.A chart depicts the LucidSound LS50X (cyan) gaming headset's frequency response relative to the SoundGuys Consumer Curve V2 (pink), and shows the headset's under-emphasized sub-bass response.

The LS50X isn’t cheap, but it has a lot to offer. The headset supports connections over a USB dongle, as well as Bluetooth using the SBC and AAC codecs. It also offers just shy of 27 hours of playback on a single charge. As we mentioned above, Dolby Atmos for Headphones is a free app you can download both on Windows and Xbox Series X/S, but normally you’d need to pay separately for access to the spatial audio it provides—the LucidSound LS50X comes with two years of free support, so you won’t have to worry about an extra fee for a long time.

The headset is pretty heavy, but its primarily metal construction also feels quite sturdy. Basically, it’s a solid premium option that manages to neatly execute on most of the features you’d want in a gaming headset.

If you own a PlayStation 5, get the Astro A20 (Gen 2)

Astro is a world-renowned gaming company and the A20 (Gen 2) headset from Astro makes this list for its expandable cross-platform compatibility. When you buy the Xbox version of the A20 (Gen 2), you get a 2.4GHz wireless dongle that supports the Xbox Wireless connection. This means the A20 (Gen 2) will work very well on Xbox consoles, and well enough on PC, which is great for gamers who only use those two platforms. If you’re willing to pony up for an extra $20 USD for a PlayStation-specific adapter, you can use the headset with a PlayStation 5 and presumably a Nintendo Switch too.

Astro A20 (Gen 2)
7.3
The Astro A20 sits on a headphone stand in the SoundGuys office.A woman wears the Astro A20 gaming headset at the SoundGuys offices.The Astro A20 gaming headset lays on its side, showing its side panel and microphone.The Astro A20 gaming headset lays on a leather surface in front of a HyperX gaming keyboard, a Logitech gaming mouse, and a Microsoft Xbox controller.A frequency response chart for the Astro A20 gaming headset microphone, which shows a lack of emphasis in low and high range soundAn isolation chart for the Astro A20 gaming headset, showing very little in the way of isolation value.A frequency response chart for the Astro A20 gaming headset, which shows the headset has pretty accurate sound output.

This is a wireless-only headset, so you can’t plug it into your phone or PC with a standard 3.5mm connection. With that said, the A20 (Gen 2) has a good battery life of 20 hours, 33 minutes, which is five hours longer than Astro posits. When you’re in that night-long gaming session, you can use the onboard volume dial or toggle the buttons to cycle between game and chat channels (though the latter doesn’t work on PC). To mute yourself, just flip the mic up at a moment’s notice.

In game sound is very good with the Astro A20 (Gen 2), as its bass output isn’t that much louder than the mids. With a sound like this, you’ll be tuned into your virtual surroundings and able to hear more delicate sounds thanks to the treble boost.

The best wireless Xbox Series X/S gaming headsets: Notable mentions

HyperX CloudX Stinger Core leans on a HyperX gaming keyboard.
The game/chat balance dial on the CloudX Stinger Core Wireless is nice, but it doesn’t work on PC.
  • Razer Kaira Pro: If the Kaira Wireless looked interested, and spending $50 USD more for Bluetooth is attractive, the Razer Kaira Pro is a solid option.
  • HyperX CloudX Stinger Core Wireless: This stripped-back Xbox gaming headset uses Xbox Wireless to connect to your console without a dongle. It’s pretty inconvenient on other platforms, but it sounds nice, has decent battery performance, and it’s comfortable. It’s priced similarly to better all-around options, but if it’s what’s available, it’ll do just fine.

Hold up! Something’s different:

Some of our picks’ and notable mentions’ frequency response and isolation charts were measured with our old testing system. We have since purchased a Bruel & Kjaer 5128 test fixture (and the appropriate support equipment) to update our testing and data collection. It will take a while to update our backlog of old test results, but we will update this article (and many others!) once we’re able with improved sound quality measurements and isolation performance plots. These will be made obvious with our new chart aesthetic (black background instead of white).

Thank you for bearing with us, and we hope to see you again once we’ve sorted everything out.

What you should know about Xbox Series X/S headsets

The Xbox Series X/S in grey against a green background.
The Xbox Series X houses a 1TB NVMe SSD, with read speeds up to 2GB per second.

If you’re upgrading from the Xbox One, the first thing you should know is that the Xbox Series X and Xbox Series S have identical audio capabilities to the Xbox One. The new consoles support wireless audio connections over Xbox Wireless and the occasional USB dongle, but if a headset connects with anything other than the 3.5mm jack on the controller, it needs to be made exclusively for this console (PC compatibility is okay, though). Just like before, this means multi-console gamers will have to have separate gaming headsets: one for their Xbox, and one for everything else.

Does the Xbox Series X/S have 3D sound?

The Xbox Series X/S doesn’t have a brand new audio processor like the PlayStation 5, but it supports three different virtual surround sound options. Windows Sonic is the default spatial audio standard for all Microsoft platforms, including Windows, and it works with any stereo headset, whether you’re connected over Xbox Wireless or 3.5mm. Additionally, the Xbox Series X/S allows you to download apps for DTS Headphone: X and Dolby Atmos for Headphones, two premium spatial audio standards made by third parties. Both these standards can work with compatible headsets, but they’ll require a separate subscription if your new headset doesn’t grant access for a period of time.

Why should you get a gaming headset?

A screenshot of SteelSeries Engine's menu for the SteelSeries Arctis 9 gaming headset
SteelSeries Engine offers pretty much the same features on every compatible gaming headset.

Gaming headsets have certain benefits over standard headphones that you could just use for gaming. With gaming headphones, you often get unique controls like built-in mute function or the ability to adjust a game/chat mix. Unlike standard wired headphones or Blueototh headphones that you could conceivably use for gaming, many gaming headsets come with dedicated apps. While some gaming headset apps don’t offer a ton of useful features beyond adjusting the RGB hues, others give you granular control over the EQ or allow you to change how the microphone sounds.

If you’re strapped for cash, you can absolutely skate by with a good pair of headphones and connect it to your PC or console controller, but if you can swing it and want all the extra features, we think there are plenty of gaming headsets worth your time.

Why you should trust SoundGuys

Like all of our best lists and reviews, none of our writers benefit from championing one product over another. We adhere to a strict ethics policy. If we award something, it’s because it’s a good product—simple as that. We subject each product that comes our way to a battery of tests that are appropriate for its specific category.

A man wears the Razer Kaira Wireless sitting at a computer, with posters for My Brother, My Brother and Me, and Canada Heritage Minutes in the background.
No glowing LED lights on the Razer Kaira Wireless.

The gaming headset space, much like many other parts of the audio industry, is rife with exaggerated language and gimmicky features that often don’t add much of anything to your experience. It’s easy to get caught up in the flashy lights and promises of immersive audio and bass so intense it’ll rupture your eardrums (in a good way, somehow), but most of that stuff flat out doesn’t matter. That’s why we review headsets, and why we have lists like this.

When it comes down to it, we don’t just review gaming headsets because I’m passionate about good audio. Most of what I do here at SoundGuys focuses on gaming content, and that’s because I’ve been a gamer my whole life. You name it, I’ve probably played it. I know what kind of audio features are important for different kinds of games, and maybe more importantly: which ones aren’t.

Frequently asked questions about the best wireless Xbox Series X/S gaming headsets