Jabra has a horse in nearly every race when it comes to consumer audio, and the Jabra Elite 45h is a great addition to the company’s portfolio. These lightweight on-ear headphones are meant to accompany you anywhere, and do just about everything well enough. Microphone quality is very good and battery life is the best we’ve tested, but some users may find it hard to justify full-fledged headphones when plenty of excellent true wireless earbuds exist.

Editor’s note: This article was updated on October 27, 2020, to address the FAQ regarding water resistance.

Who should get the Jabra Elite 45h?

A picture of the Jabra Elite 45h on-ear Bluetooth headphones being worn by a woman in profile to illustrate how the headset fits.

The Elite 45h have a slim profile that doesn’t weigh you down.

  • General consumers will appreciate these reasonably priced headphones. For less than $100, you’re afforded great microphone quality, long battery life, and a portable design.
  • Commuters may want to get the Jabra Elite 45h for its unobtrusive design, and long battery life.
  • Remote workers whose days are filled with conference calls will get a lot of mileage out of this headset, because the complex microphone system does a great job of transmitting clear audio.

Editor’s note: our Jabra Elite 45h review unit was temporarily provided by Jabra and operated with firmware version 2.3.9 during testing.

What’s it like to use the Jabra Elite 45h?

A picture of the Jabra Elite 45h on-ear Bluetooth headphones being placed into a sling bag by a woman.

You can take the Elite 45h anywhere.

Jabra’s headphones are made for the everyday listener, and the design reflects that: this compact on-ear headset is easy to transport for on-the-go listening. The Jabra Elite 45h are covered under a two-year warranty, which includes dust and water protection. While you may not want to do multiple intensive workouts while wearing the Elite 45h, you can certainly skate by with some light exercise.

To stow the headphones in a bag, swivel the ear cups and insert the flattened headset into the neoprene pouch. Although the pouch isn’t protective against hard drops, it does a good job of protecting the headphones from scuffs. The all-plastic construction may be unappealing to some, but it keeps the headphones lightweight and more affordable than alternatives with premium construction.

Synthetic leather wraps the memory foam ear pads, which are labeled with an “L” and “R” for easy identification. Jabra used a soft-touch rubberized material for the headband cushion, which is moderately comfortable. Despite the featherweight design, it took just over an hour for throbbing ear and head pain to kick in; this happened regardless of whether or not I wore glasses.

A picture of the Jabra Elite 45h on-ear Bluetooth headphones right ear cup to display the onboard button controls and Bluetooth toggle.

The buttons aren’t well distinguished and hard to identify correctly on the first try.

Rather than use touch controls, Jabra’s on-ear headphones house buttons on the edge of the right ear cup. Nestled near the headband, the buttons allow users to control playback, volume, and call interactions. A front-facing button on the other side of the ear cup lets you access your smart assistant of choice be it Siri, Google Assistant, or Amazon Alexa. It can also be used to mute your microphone during a call. A final toggle at the base of the ear cup, near the USB-C input, may be pushed forward to manually initiate pairing mode or switched to power the Jabra Elite 45h on and off.

The Jabra Elite 45h doesn’t have a headphone jack for wired playback.

Although I generally prefer tactile buttons to touch controls, the layout of the Jabra Elite 45h buttons made it hard to distinguish between the volume buttons that flank the multifunction button. What’s more, the controls deviate from the norm and the volume buttons double as playback controls, while the multifunction button is meant just for pause/resume and call functionality.

Should you get the Jabra Sound+ app?

An over-the-shoulder picture of the Jabra Elite 45h on-ear Bluetooth headphones connected to the Jabra MySound+ application on a smartphone held by a woman.

The Jabra Sound+ app is easy to understand, and lets you customize the sound.

As with any application, your smartphone may be subject to data collection by downloading the Jabra Sound+ app, which is detailed in the company’s privacy policy. As far as user interfaces go, Jabra’s application is one of the best: its slick, high-contrast design is easy to read and understand. Users can personalize their listening experience by creating custom EQs that are saved to the headphones, meaning the sound signature you select is used across source devices. You can take this a step further with Jabra MySound; this requires you to take a hearing test and fill out basic demographic information in order for the application to create an optimal sound profile.

The app also lets you customize your call settings by introducing sidetone functionality, which makes it easier for you to hear your own voice during a call. If none of these features interest you, the Jabra Sound+ is worth a periodic download because it’s required in order to receive firmware updates to your headset. It’s available across devices, and all features are supported on iOS and Android.

Bluetooth connectivity is stable

A picture of the Jabra Elite 45h on-ear Bluetooth headphones next to a Samsung Galaxy S10e smartphone and wireless car keys on a white table.

Bluetooth multipoint is available but not very reliable.

The Jabra Elite 45h use Bluetooth 5.0 firmware and maintain a reliable, stable connection so long as you remain within the 10-meter wireless range. During my review period, connection errors only occurred when I was using Bluetooth multipoint, which never worked properly. If I was playing music on my laptop, and had the headset connected to my phone for incoming text notifications, music playback never paused to alert me to an incoming text or email. I was, however, alerted to an incoming call.

Learn more: Bluetooth codecs 101

AAC is the only high-quality Bluetooth codec supported by the Jabra Elite 45h, which is a shame for us Android users. Android and AAC mix poorly, and high-quality AAC streaming qualities are inconsistent across Android devices. The headset lacks a 3.5mm input, so high-resolution playback isn’t possible with the Elite 45h.

Minimal audio-visual lag is present when using the Jabra Elite 45h with an Android device, and this was true when I tested it with both a Google Pixel 3 and Samsung Galaxy S10e. My eyes and ears adjusted to the half-second delay during a 10-minute YouTube video, so the lag isn’t offensive by any means.

How long does the battery last?

Jabra makes bold claims with the Elite 45h battery life, championing 50 hours of music playback on a single charge. We subjected the headphones to a constant 75dB(SPL) output, and they lasted over 54 hours on a single charge. This is insane and as impressive as it is unnecessary for most users.

The Jabra Elite 85h have the best battery life on the market.

Fast charging the headset is a breeze, and proves efficient relative to other headsets with a quick charge feature. All you have to do is set aside 15 minutes to connect the USB-C cable, and you’re rewarded with 10 hours of battery life. Fully charging the headset takes just 1.5 hours, which means you can quickly top-up the headset between meetings or classes.

How do the Jabra Elite 45h sound?

A frequency chart for the Jabra Elite 45h on-ear Bluetooth headphones depicting a neutral-leaning sound signature up until the upper-midrange and low-treble frequencies.

The Jabra Elite 45h reproduce audio accurately across the frequency spectrum, so your music should be reproduced clearly.

The Jabra Elite 45h accurately reproduce audio across the range of audible frequencies, but what this chart can’t show is that clarity is okay at best. Each ear cup houses a large 40mm dynamic driver which reproduces vocals louder than some bass notes. Listeners who enjoy vocal-heavy music or whose libraries lack bass-heavy tracks will appreciate Jabra’s neutral-leaning sound signature.

The accurate sub-bass and bass reproduction may sound like it lacks the oomph you might be accustomed to hearing from your favorite tracks. This is because many consumer earbuds and headphones amplify bass notes to sound anywhere from 50-200% louder than mids. If you prefer the standard bass-heavy sound, you can create a custom EQ or pick from any of Jabra’s presets in the Sound+ app.

However, the on-ear design lets the headphones down in a number of ways relating to how tough it is to get a good seal. For example, a lot of notes can easily get masked by outside noise, or sound quieter than they should.

An isolation chart for the Jabra Elite 45h on-ear Bluetooth headphones, illustrating that low-frequency sounds remain audible with the headset, but background chit-chat should sound 1/2 as loud with the headphones on.

Passive isolation isn’t very effective, which is the nature of on-ear headphones, so you’ll hear plenty of what’s going on around you.

Isolation isn’t very good with the Jabra Elite 45h, but that’s to be expected with on-ear headphones. The headphones don’t place your head in a vice grip every time you wear them, so plenty of external noise will make it into your ears. Walking around town with the Elite 45h, I can hear almost everything around me. This can be good for safety reasons, but if you’re looking for a travel headset, the Elite 45h isn’t it.

Lows, mids, and highs

In Good Morning Baltimore sung by Nikki Blonsky, the opening kick drum is heard but doesn’t have the anticipated loudness and, well, kick typically experienced during the song. Cymbal hits and clashes are relayed more clearly than the bass notes, and even remain audible during the first verse of the theatrical ballad.

Blonsky’s vocals sound quite accurate throughout, rarely masked by the low-frequency elements of the song. Her vibrato at 2:24 doesn’t sound great through the headset, because harmonic distortion is audible. The background chorus is heard clearly throughout the song, even during the last 30 seconds when it becomes the most instrumentally busy. The headset reproduces an array of music genres well, but no matter what style of music you enjoy, you’ll likely notice a lack of clarity.

Can I use the Jabra Elite 45h for phone calls?

A frequency chart for the Jabra Elite 45h on-ear Bluetooth headphones limited to the human voice band to illustrate that some low-frequencies are slightly attenuated to reduce the proximity effect.

The microphone system reduces low-frequency sensitivity to combat the proximity effect; though, plosives can still cause audio clipping.

The Jabra Elite 45h microphone quality is above average, and it does a good job of attenuating background noise. When there are high winds, the person on the other end of the call will hear audio clipping, but this is unfortunately normal in sub-optimal conditions.

Related: How to read charts

As you can hear in the demo below, my voice sounds clear even as I stand near a tower fan at its highest setting. Jabra is a trusted company when it comes to conference call audio products and professional headsets, so it’s no surprise that the Elite 45h mic system transmits clear, accurate audio.

Jabra Elite 45h microphone demo:

Please wait.. Loading poll

Jabra Elite 85h vs Jabra Elite 45h

Angled image of the Jabra Elite 85h headphones folded in the case with the USB-C and aux cable in the internal pocket.

The zippered carrying case resembles Sony’s and has a nifty organization system for the included cables and airplane adapter.

The Jabra Elite 85h may be within the same Jabra Elite family, but are wholly different headphones from the Elite 45h. For one, the Jabra Elite 85h are over-ear headphones with noise cancelling technology. This larger build may be unappealing to some, but it’s key to a good pair of noise cancelling headphones. The Elite 85h ear cups completely encompass the ears and effectively block out background noise. The Elite 85h are also more flexible than the Elite 45h: the ear cups can rotate to lie flat and fold up towards the headband to fit in the more protective zippered case.

You may like: Best noise cancelling headphones

The Elite 85h battery lasted nearly 35 hours on a single charge which is very good but doesn’t touch the rated 50-hour battery life from the Jabra Elite 45h. Both headsets support fast charging: 15 minutes connected to the USB-C cable grants the Elite 85h five hours of playtime, which is half as efficient as the Elite 45h fast charging performance.

Neither headset supports aptX for reliable, high-quality streaming on Android; however, the Jabra Elite 85h houses a headphones jack for wired playback. Both of Jabra’s headphones support Bluetooth multipoint, but it was more reliable with the over-ear headset.

Should you buy the Jabra Elite 45h?

A picture of the Jabra Elite 45h on-ear Bluetooth headphones halfway inside the included neoprene carrying case that's resting on a windowsill.

Jabra provides a neoprene pouch that does little to protect the headphones.

The Jabra Elite 45h are a great pair of on-ear headphones for casual listeners, and are some of the best on-ear headphones under $100. They aren’t perfect, but no headphones are. If you prioritize portability and microphone quality over all else, this is the headset for you. Listeners who don’t want to commit to headphones should consider the Jabra Elite 75t true wireless earbuds, which boast very good microphone quality, solid battery life, and a stylish design that doesn’t protrude from the ears.

If you still want on-ear headphones but you aren’t in love with the Elite 45h, consider a pair of renewed Bose SoundLink On-Ear Wireless headphones. These are the most comfortable on-ear headphones I’ve tested, and boast better sound quality and an equally good microphone system. Although the SoundLink On-Ear Wireless has an outdated microUSB input, it has many of the same features of the Elite 45h including a dedicated virtual assistant button.

Frequently Asked Questions

Does the Jabra Elite 45h feature water-resistant nano-coating?

No, the Jabra Elite 45h does not feature water-resistant nano-coating. That feature is reserved for Jabra's more expensive headphones: the Elite 85h. However, the Elite 45h does come with a two year warranty that covers damage from water and dust.

Check Price

Jabra Elite 45h
7